Home Tourism Visa Study abroad Investment Movies Musics Books Member
Hello! Welcome to the official website of chindianet. | Free singup | 中文站

current location: Home>Home -> About China -> Chindia Forum -> Social Vientiane

TOP

Faces of Chinese youth: Why are they anxious?(一)
2018-11-17 22:16:02 author: 【big in small browse:127Secondary


"I'm losing my hair, which makes me pretty agitated the entire year," says Jia Xue, a 25-year-old woman who has just become a marketing manager at an Internet company in pursuit of a more promising career.


"Baldness" became a buzzword among the post-90s generation last year, a term that is at once a label of self-mockery and a health issue growing more preva lent among young Chinese. It's not the only tag the Nineties have given themselves. Grey hair, insomnia, and gastric distress are among the common symptoms of their generation, who cite social pressure as the main culprit for these problems.


A recent annual report by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences on social mentality in China reveals that 31.6 percent of respondents often feel anxious, and those who reportedly show signs of fidgeting and strain account for 42.8 percent.


Anxiety stemming from issues with housing, education, healthcare, employment, excessive exposure to social media, and identity crises, particularly for those of a lower social status, have stoked unhappiness among the Chinese.


According to the report, the post-90s generation is the least happy while those from the post-80s trail right behind. Meanwhile, those who are at either end of the spectrum – the under-20s and septuagenarians – are the most satisfied.


Yang, a media editor born in 1991, complains about the skyrocketing house prices in Beijing, which have slowed down since mid-2018. "I can never afford a house here with my meager salary, even if one day, I'm given a pay raise," says Yang, a native of north China's Shanxi.


For years, prohibitive property prices have been besetting a majority of young Chinese working in first-tiered cities.


"I've even lost the motivation to make a more decent living because no matter how hard I try, I'm still unable to buy a house of my own," Jia Xue tells CGTN Digital. Still, she feels life is more difficult as a woman, given gender discrimination in the workplace, and even the second-child policy, which pressures women to balance family and work. "For now, I just want to stay single without a family to provide for," she laments.


Over the past couple of decades, the Chinese economy took off. Highways, flyovers, and cloud-piercing skyscrapers seemed to have been built overnight, etching out a fascinating prosperity not only materially, but socially and culturally. The post-80s and post-90s are living in an era of greater material abundance than previous generations, so they tend to embrace more post-materialist values – independence, individuality and self-expression.


"But after growing up, they'll easily feel frustrated as they find their values at odds with the real world while struggling to earn their bread," says Qu Yuping, a psychology professor based in Shanghai.


source:        

Tags:Chinese youth anxious Editor:unique
Home Pgup 1 2 Down End
big in small】【printcollect】 【recommend】【report】【comment】 【close】 【Back to top
PreviousTeacher says sexual orientation le NextTeachers in China are the world

Comment

Account Number: Password: (New User Registration)
Codes:
Expression:
Content:

 

Latest article

Latest Photo

Popular article

recommend article

Related article